Seattle vs Fashion, an open letter~

Seattle vs Fashion, an open letter~

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So there’s a douche-bag with a tumblr who’s using their cowardly anonymity not to challenge the system or cast a lamp-light upon corruption, but instead they’ve chosen to make fun of what Seattle folk wear in public.

They’ve moved to Seattle from somewhere else (as many of us, including myself, have done), and clearly they feel put upon with our provincial tastes and our general not-giving-a-fuck-about-fashioness.

Their eyes, oh how they burn!
“People wearing fashion I doth not approve of! Luckily I’m catty and have a lot of time on my hands so off a-petty blogging I go.”

Here’s the thing, ass-hat, the thing about not giving a fuck about fashion.

The thing is… WE DON’T GIVE A FUCK ABOUT FASHION.

Seattle is filled with goths, geeks, tacky queens, over-the-hill hippies, polyamourous punks, hipsters, gangstas, street kids, millionaires wearing sandals with socks, tattooed baristas, butch dykes, steampunks*, flannel shirt clad bears, retro-future-fashionistas, color blind twink metal heads, old people, and yes, fat people.

Fat men. Fat men in kilts. We. Are. Everywhere.

All of us have a couple of things in common:
We don’t give a fuck about other people’s opinions on our clothes AND WE LOVE THE FACT THAT WE ARE MAKING YOUR LIFE HERE IN SEATTLE A LIVING HELL!

So, when you see my fat, Utilikilt-clad, ass strolling around Seattle wearing some weirdo tshirt and a pair of bright orange Chucks** know this: I’m loving life and laughing my ass off at you!

Kisses,
~Jordan~

*You know those guys in top hats & bowlers and such? Those are steampunks. I mean really, how the fuck can this clownshoe live in Seattle, on Capitol Hill, and NOT KNOW WHAT A STEAMPUNK IS??? That’s like living in Wisconsin and not know the correct pronunciation of Two Rivers.

**keep in mind that there is a very real chance that I will also rocking a BOWLER HAT WITH POINTLESS GOGGLES. Choke on that.

Post Script: My friend, Robert, was actually the subject of one of the piss-ant posts.

Robert has posted a response, he’s well spoken and used a lot less naught language than I did. Check it out here:

http://chanceofdoom.com/welcome-to-the-world-mamas-boy/

He’s also a wonderful artist shoe check out his whole website!

Not in Kansas, a steampunk (photo) shoot~

Not in Kansas, a steampunk (photo) shoot~

editor’s note: I’ve had the pleasure of knowing photographer Doug Rand since 1984 (or there abouts). I was truly tickled when I saw that recently tried is lens at a bit of steampunk. I’m honored to be able to share them with you today…

Model – Ruby Stardust
MUA, hair, fashion styling – Ruby Stardust
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – McKenzie Maclaine
MUA, hair, Fashion styling – McKenzie Maclaine
Necklace – Shannon Hoffman
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Jim Summers
MUA, Styling – Jim Summers
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Christy Madison
Fashion Styling – Silversärk Clothier
Master Hair Designer – Leah
MUA – Heather
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – DeAnna McNeil
MUA, Styling, Hair – DeAnna McNeil
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16

Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – McKenzie Maclaine
MUA, hair, Fashion styling – McKenzie Maclaine
Necklace – Shannon Hoffman
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Jim Summers
MUA, Styling – Jim Summers
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model (Right) – McKenzie Maclaine
MUA, hair, Fashion styling – McKenzie Maclaine
Necklace – Shannon Hoffman
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux
Model (Left) – Lori Harris
MUA, hair, styling – Lori Harris
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – DeAnna McNeil
MUA, Styling, Hair – DeAnna McNeil
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Ruby Stardust
MUA, hair, fashion styling – Ruby Stardust
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Christy Madison
Fashion Styling – Silversärk Clothier
Master Hair Designer – Leah
MUA – Heather
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

Model – Christy Madison
Fashion Styling – Silverstark
Master Hair Designer – Leah
MUA – Heather
Production Concept – Colour Law
Photographer – Doug Rand https://www.facebook.com/doug.rand.16
Assistant – Janice Rabideaux

1920s Fashion for Your Body Type

By Vintage Dancer:

“There are many tips women were given the 1920′s to choose the right clothing based on your figure as well as hair color, face shape, height and age.  I put all these tips in the free 1920′s Fashion or Your Body Type ebook. I just finished revising it with even more information and about 40 new pictures of 20′s clothing. It should help you pick an outfit that is the most flattering.”

Read more on the blog page, or download the PDF  here: 1920s-Fashion-for-Your-Body-Type

http://www.vintagedancer.com/1920s/1920s-plus-size-fashion-history/

Goggles! to the Future!~

Goggles! to the Future!~

As noted in a recent article on Cracked, sci-fi repeatedly predicts we’ll be wearing goggle-glasses in the future…

http://www.cracked.com/blog/4-bizarrely-specific-rules-that-exist-in-movie-universes_p2/

 


Pitch Black


Oblivion


The Matrix


The Postman

Interview: Baroness Violet von Mickelsburg from Steam Ingenious blog~

Interview: Baroness Violet von Mickelsburg from Steam Ingenious blog~

Baroness Violet von Mickelsburg is the talented lady behind the Steam Ingenious blog, she was kind enough to answer some questions for us…

Baroness Violet von Mickelsburg

Sepiachord: When did you found Steam Ingenious? What led you to creating it?

Steam Ingenious: I started the blog at the beginning of 2011.  At the time I had been working on steampunk costumes for about a year and I had learned a few techniques I wanted to share.  But what really started me thinking about starting a steampunk blog was that I came up with the name Steam Ingenious, which is inspired by the Modest Mouse song “Steam Engenius.”  So I thought, “Wow, that would be a good name for a steampunk blog….maybe I should start one.”

 Modest Mouse

SC: You could’ve created a blog about anything, why steampunk? What about steampunk speaks to you?

SI: Such a huge question…I was first drawn to steampunk because I’ve always been a fan of anything Victorian.  I’ve been a huge Sherlock Holmes fan since I was 11 and when I decided to start putting together my first steampunk costume I was on a Victorian literature kick.  So I thought it would be fun to put together an outfit and wear it to a con once a year or so.  Except after my first con, I immediately wanted to do it again and again, and was at my second con with a slightly improved steampunk outfit two weeks later.  As many people experience, after that it became an addiction.  The blog was initially just someplace I could document my projects and share the techniques I was learning with others. The best thing about steampunk is that the community is oriented to share information freely and encourage others to create and experiment within the steampunk aesthetic, and I want my blog to reflect that.

Sherlock Holmes

SC: Steampunk covers a lot of ground, what sort of topics does Steam Ingenious cover?

SI: My primary focus is sewing and costuming.  Before I joined the steampunk community I’d never used a sewing machine, and now I’m a professional seamstress.  The blog has both documented that journey and allowed me to share my knowledge with others on a similar path.  One of my primary interests is corsetry and corsetmaking, so I cover a lot of topics related to buying, wearing, and making corsets.  But since steampunk crafting covers such a wide range of skills, I also have discussed gun modding and leatherworking. I aim to encourage people to try new things, even things they might be intimidated by.
SC: What does your blog offer that’s makes it special from other blogs?

SI: I haven’t really seen other blogs that offer sewing tutorials specifically geared towards steampunk projects. In fact, the lack of these kinds of tutorials was one of the things that motivated me to start posting in the first place.

SC:  Do you feel that it’s important for people who are interested in steampunk to be active in the discussion of it, that steampunks have a responsibility to start blogs, websites and discussions on forums?

SI: Well, I wouldn’t say that anyone has a responsibility to do anything that they’re not inclined to do, but I do think it is important for steampunks to communicate and participate in discussions about our subculture.  I think it can be a detriment to the community if regional groups or artist groups become too insular.
SC: What’s the best post that you’ve ever put up on Steam Ingenious?

SI: It’s so difficult to choose, but I’m going to say either “Socializing Steampunks”, (http://steamingenious.blogspot.com/2012/06/socializing-steampunks-thoughts-for.html) which is a guide to socializing with other steampunks, or my post about Steampunk Personas (http://steamingenious.blogspot.com/2012/09/steampunk-personas.html).


SC: What’s your favorite steampunk creation or who’s your favorite creator?

SI: It’s not fair, you keep asking really difficult questions. It really depends on the category: favorite gun, favorite hat, favorite outfit, favorite corset… As far as large builds, I’m a fan of Hatton Cross Steampunk, because he posts such detailed information and photos of his process that you can learn a lot just from that. But there are so many great, inspiring artists out there.

Hatton Cross Steampunk

SC: Where do you want to see your website go? What are your goals in steampunk?

SI: Well naturally I’d always like to have more readers and more commenters on my blog. I enjoy writing the type of posts I linked to above, guides for people new to steampunk, and I want to do more of that. I have a bunch of goals for myself personally: this year I am focusing on refining my skills as a seamstress and corsetmaker, regularly vending at cons and events, and increasing the number and type of panels I present at cons. Along with trying to constantly offer new and interesting content at the blog, I have my hands full, but I simply love this community and this genre.

 

SC: Everybody has their own personal definition of steampunk, what’s yours?

SI: Well I tend to keep things pretty simple: Steampunk is Victorian science fiction. I think that’s the base of steampunk, where we start out, and of course there are infinite directions you can go from there. But when it boils down to it, I think you need both elements: Victoriana (even if only as a design inspiration) and science fiction.

SC: What do you think are the biggest challenges to steampunk as movement/community?

SI: Honestly, I think the real danger in the steampunk community is having things get too focused on individual personalities and interpersonal drama. We’re a fairly small community all things considered and the internet makes everyone neighbors. Any small community eventually struggles with personality conflicts, clique-ishness, and gossip. I’m afraid that an overly “insider” culture that lets itself get too concerned with these sorts of issues may prevent new people from fully engaging in the community. And we vitally need new community members, enthusiasts, and artists if this movement is going to have staying power.

SC: What’s your least favorite thing about steampunk?

SI: Hmm, see above. I think that one of the wonderful things about steampunk is that people can go from complete newbies to active makers really quickly. But occasionally this breeds a certain amount of ego, and people start to feel they are owed certain things, like free admission into events. And one ego crashes with another and makes it unpleasant for the vast majority of people who are simply trying to have fun.

SC: How often do you get all gussied up in steampunk gear?

SI: It depends on the season, but typically once or twice a month.

SC: What other good sources for steampunk can you recommend?

SI: I’m a voracious collector of links, so Pinterest is my favorite place to find new steampunk creations and resources. (I have thousands of steampunk pins collected myself at: http://pinterest.com/baronessviolet )

The Facebook page of steamcircus.com (http://www.facebook.com/pages/SteamCircuscom/206919582693093) is another great resource for finding creations and links to tutorials.

SC: Any final thoughts?

SI: Thank you for this opportunity to talk about my favorite subject!

Steam Ingenius: http://steamingenious.blogspot.com/

Hatton Cross Steampunk: http://chalagi1.wix.com/hcsteam

Modest Mouse: http://www.modestmouse.com

Sherlock Holmes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes

Steam Circus: http://www.steamcircus.com

Oz the Great and Powerful, some thoughts

Oz the Great and Powerful, some thoughts

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oz_the_Great_and_Powerful

In honor of my company’s 60th anniversary the bosses treated us to a showing of Oz the Great and Powerful yesterday morning.

My love of flying monkeys is well known and remains intact despite Zach Braff’s flat, one note take on Finley. I think the problem is that Braff has a subtly expressive face that usually serves him well but can’t be in-play here. On the other hand Finley wasn’t just a machine gunning one-liners as “wacky” sidekicks are often prone to, which was a relief.

The movie features a lush, saturated CGI palate. It’s nice if a bit overwhelming at times, and the movie does drag a bit in the middle. The only thing that I really thought they fell down on was when living actors “picked up” the CGI China Girl, it never looked convincing not once.

But overall I found Oz the Great and Powerful a pleasant, fairly entertaining film and I liked that they gave Glinda a bit of teeth. You can now imagine her has the chess-master in future Oz tales, nut just a deus-ex-machina fairy queen. But I’m still looking forward to a fantasy film where the characters stand up against “prophecy”, the complex relationships between the witches in this tale may have been more interesting if they were willing to challenge what their father wanted (in regards to a King returning).

In the long run though I don’t think we’ll be seeing this as a long remembered of cherished film. It’s nice, and pretty, but not daring. And, as an Oz fan, I still wait for a movie with a smart, resourceful Dorothy…

Steampunks will surely take note of the tinkers and the gadgets Oz put together… and the goggles they don.

I do predict that Theodora’s first outfit, with it’s striking red hat, lovely jacket, sexy blouse and *ahem* snug black leather pants are sure to have an influence on ladies’ retro-fashion.